Monday, November 16, 2009

Checking in on World Diabetes Day

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World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated each year on November 14. The WDD campaign aims to educate millions of people worldwide about diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is one of the many diseases that sleep apnea patients are at risk for developing.

Many dentists treat sleep apnea because they like helping their patients become healthy. Treating sleep apnea helps prevent many diseases, including type 2 diabetes, heart attack and stroke.

Dentists treat sleep apnea with oral appliance therapy. They use oral appliances to reposition the lower jaw and tongue forward, creating an open airway during sleep. This helps their patients’ get a good night’s rest.

Getting enough sleep is important for overall health, as is eating healthy and exercising.

The Sleep Education blog reported on a study that found that undiagnosed apnea is common in people with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis can be done at an accredited sleep center.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends dietary weight loss as a treatment strategy for obese people who have sleep apnea. Weight loss should be combined with another treatment such as CPAP or an oral appliance.

The IDF estimates that 285 million people are living with diabetes and 344 million people worldwide are at risk. These are huge numbers, but there are many dentists who are chipping away at these numbers and improving their patients’ lives.

OSA is a serious condition. Learn more here.

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Disclaimer

The Official Blog of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) is intended as an information source only. Content of this blog should not be used for self-diagnosis or treatment, and it is not a substitute for medical care, which should be provided by the appropriate health care professional. If you suspect you have a sleep-related breathing disorder, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), you should consult your personal physician or visit an AASM-accredited sleep disorders center. The AADSM, and the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, as the managing agent of the AADSM, assume no liability for the information contained on the Official Blog of the AADSM or for its use.